5 Things to Do Near Columbus, Georgia

Looking for peace and serenity among the well-chronicled Georgia pines, with a little bit of outdoor adventure, southern hospitality, and old-town charm thrown in for good measure? Plan a stay at Pine Mountain RV Resort and prepare to be stunned by the beauty of nature found in this western Georgia gem of a location.


Just an hour from Atlanta, 45 minutes from Columbus and only three miles from the amazing Callaway Gardens, Pine Mountain RV Resort has it all when it comes to location, amenities, and cool glamping accommodations. Cabins, yurts, and brand-new glamping tents are options as well as tent and RV sites. Plus, the resort is pet-friendly so all pets, not just Georgia Bulldogs, are welcome here.

Pine Mountain RV Resort
Pine Mountain RV Resort


As for nearby attractions, we found 5 things to consider when enjoying a glamping getaway here! We don’t include Callaway Gardens, because no visit to this area should not include time spent at this magical attraction that features botanic gardens, nature trails, the Cecil B. Day Butterfly Center, and several special annual events like “Pumpkins at Callaway,” which runs through October 30, and the holiday event “Fantasy in Lights,” which is scheduled for November 18 through January 1, 2023. Visit callawaygardens.com for more information.

Cecil B. Day Butterfly Center
Cecil B. Day Butterfly Center
  1. Little White House and Franklin D. Roosevelt State Park: FDR came to the area in 1924 looking for relief from his polio in the waters of nearby Warm Springs. He returned many times throughout the years and the home where he stayed, dubbed The Little White House, is now a National Historic Landmark (visit gastateparks.org/LittleWhiteHouse for details on visiting). When in the area, he often picnicked at Dowdell’s Knob, which is now part of Franklin D. Roosevelt State Park, Georgia’s largest state park at 9,049 acres. The Park includes the very popular 23-mile Pine Mountain Trail, which offers views of plenty of pines and several waterfalls. The Park also has 42 miles of hiking trails, 28 miles of horseback riding trails, and swimming, birding, fishing, and geocaching opportunities, plus canoe, kayak, and aqua cycle rentals for water fun. Don’t miss the photo op with the statue of FDR which can be found at Dowdell’s Knob.
  2. World of Coca Cola: From sampling to smelling to trying your hand at creating your own version of the famed soft drink, World of Coca Cola has something for everyone. There’s the history of how local pharmacist John Pemberton first invented the drink to a detailed tour of the bottling process. Then there’s the vault where the secret recipe is kept and loads and loads of pop culture items featuring Coca Cola. Take a pic with the Coca Cola Polar Bear, view historic artifacts from the soft drink’s international promotions and purchase personalized items at the Coca Cola Store. Located in Atlanta, World of Coca Cola is open 7 days a week. Details can be found at worldofcocacola.com.
  3. College Football Hall of Fame: Since it was founded in 1951, the location of the College Football Hall of Fame has been passed around more than a game-day fumble but has called Atlanta home since 2014. Spread over 3 floors with themed galleries, the HOF is home to more than 50 interactive exhibits and includes a 47-yard football field. The Quad features the three-story Helmet Wall with helmets displayed representing 755 schools. All players inducted into the Hall of Fame are recognized with an augmented reality display with stories and video. Every Saturday during college football season, the HOF hosts their GameDay Tailgate with games, prizes, and of course, football action. For information visit cfbhall.com.
  4. Odds and Ends: Some unusual things to do the area could include a visit to (and lunch at) The Lunchbox Museum in Columbus, which features over 5,000 pieces of lunchbox memorabilia. And, since 2021, the museum houses several other collections including the Nehi Drink Museum, the Royal Crown Cola Museum, and the Tom Huston Peanuts Museum – all contained in one spot. Visit thelunchboxmuseum.com for details. Want to see Atlanta in a unique way? Take a stroll around the city and look for the tiny doors. There are 20 7-inch tiny doors created by artist Karen Anderson Singer to “reflect the spirit, architecture and other unique elements of the surrounding community” hidden around the city. To find a map of the tiny doors, visit tinydoorsatl.com.
  5. Movies and More: Are you a fan of the Marvel Universe, or perhaps the creepy gang of zombies from The Walking Dead are more your cup of tea? Have you watched Sweet Home Alabama more times than you can count? If any of this is to your liking, you may enjoy the Southern Hollywood Film Tour, a two-hour driving tour with plenty of photo ops (southernhollywoodfilmtour.com/tours) that highlights filming locations for the above-mentioned faves. Viator also offers several celeb-related tours including the Touring Dead Walking Tour or one centering on the Bravo TV hit, The Real Housewives of Atlanta (viator.com). Or, seek out famous locations on your own! Fans of The Hunger Games movie series will recognize President Snow’s mansion (really The Swan House at the Atlanta history Center) or the futuristic interior of Atlanta’s Marriott Marquis that doubled as the Tribute’s quarters in the film. If you liked the Vampire Diaries, a drive to nearby Covington (about 75 miles from the resort) might be of interest. Here you’ll find locations that served as the Mystic Falls Clock Tower (actually the historic Newton County Courthouse), both Lockwood mansions, and Gram’s House. For location details, visit screenrant.com/the-vampire-diaries-filming-locations-sets-fans-visit-explore.
Pine Mountain RV Resort Glamping Tent
Pine Mountain RV Resort Glamping Tent

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5 Things to Do In Portland

Rip City, Stumptown, City of Roses, Bridgetown, Portlandia. Whatever you want to call Portland, which does in fact carry the nicknames mentioned here for a variety of reasons, Oregon’s largest city is a great one to visit for many reasons. While exploring the area, stay in a tiny house, cabin, or yurt at Mt. Hood Village to get the best of both worlds: a little bit of nature while keeping Portland weird. Here are five things to do while visiting the area:

  1. As green as Portland is (it was named the third greenest city in 2021 in a Wallethub study), spending lots of your own personal “green” doesn’t have to be first and foremost here. There are so many things to do in Portland that are free, and we mean absolute zero cost to enjoy these things. The Saturday Market featuring 350 artisans is free (what you buy is up to you); browsing through the books at Powell’s City of Books, considered the world’s largest independent book store, is free (again, avid readers may have a different outcome); Elk Rock Gardens, a hidden gem of a botanical garden, is free; and access to Forest Park, Portland’s 5200-acre urban forest, is absolutely free and visitors can hike, bike, or simply stroll along the trails to see wildlife and beautiful greenery.
  2. Eat, drink and be weird! Another slogan associated with the city is “Keep Portland Weird” which came about when a blog compared Austin and Portland to see which city was “weirder.” One of the reasons Portland took top billing was the Voodoo Doughnut shop, which after opening in 2003 wedged between two nightclubs, quickly became the hippest spot to enjoy sweet treats. To enjoy a Voodoo Bubble (a donut topped with a piece of Double Bubble gum) or a chocolate-iced Voodoo Doll, visit the original in Old Town, or the second Portland location on Davis Street. Of course, coffee and doughnuts go together, so consider a tour with Third Wave Coffee Tours, which offers a variety of tours to taste Portland’s coffee offerings and are said to have had a following all their own long before that other Pacific Northwest based coffee place! For tour info, visit thirdwavecoffeetours.com.
Hiking around Portland
  1. Portland outdoor adventure has several options from on the waters to in the mountains. Consider a kayak ride on the Willamette River that takes you through the downtown area with great skyline views. Take a trip to Sauvie Island (about 30 minutes outside the city) which has several trails for hiking and biking as well as Sauvie Island Farms (sauvieislandfarms.com) which offers u-pick opportunities for seasonal fruits and veggies. Don’t miss Multnomah Falls, Oregon’s tallest waterfall, located along the historic Columbia River Highway. Several viewing platforms are available along the route and the falls can also be seen via a moderate hike.
  2. Eating and Drinking – Part Two: A visit to Portland must include a stop in the city’s Pearl District, home to breweries, bakeries, cafes, restaurants, art galleries, and shops. The galleries host First Thursdays on the first Thursday of each month where art galleries stay open late and live music and other entertainment are often featured. Wine tours of the nearby Willamette wineries are an option (check out willamettewines.com) and City Brew Tours have options for tours to taste some of the Pacific Northwest’s finest beers (citybrewtours.com). For foodie options, consider checking out many of the “food carts” in the city, especially The Cart Blocks in Ankeny Square. Just south of the Pearl District is 1927 S’mores, a gourmet s’mores shop that will have you falling in love with this campfire taste treat. Appropriately themed like a cabin, visitors can choose from s’mores flavors such as coco raspberry, moose tracks, whiskey salted caramel, seasonal options, and more, including the classic chocolate and marshmallow combo.
  3. Whatever the nickname you prefer, to find out the history of Portland, visit some of these interesting museums that tell the story of the area – the World Forestry Center, located in Washington Park; the Oregon Rail Heritage Center; the Oregon Maritime Museum, housed in an historic steam-powered tug on the Willamette River and the Oregon Historical Society Museum, home to the Portland Penny which was flipped in 1845 to determine the city’s name – it was Portland or Boston!
Cabin at Mt. Hood Village Resort
Cabin at Mt. Hood Village Resort

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Take a Vacation, Please!

A not so pleasant statistic is that the U.S. falls well below other countries when it comes to paid time off. Europe is far ahead of America when it comes to providing paid time off for employees. According to a May 2022 article in Travel + Leisure, Austria provides 25 days of paid annual leave, plus another 13 for public holidays, totaling 38 paid days off. France and Spain each offer 36 in total and Germany provides 30 days. The U.S. average is 10 days a year.

An even sadder statistic is that 54% of Americans don’t use all their vacation days. A 2019 study by the U.S. Travel Association showed that U.S. employees left approximately 768 million vacation days unused in 2018. And most Americans say they have too much work to do to take vacation time. That sounds pretty counterintuitive since studies show that vacation can reduce stress and increase productivity upon return to work. 

Before burnout hits and you make a mistake that could find you with plenty of days off, we suggest you get out and glamp! Hit the beach, climb every mountain, go off the grid, and for heaven’s sake, turn off your computer and work phone (we know you need the personal one for the Instagram shots of the great vacation you’ll be documenting)!

And, while experts suggest 8 days is the sweet spot for a full recharge, long weekends and a few days here and there could be just the recipe that helps Americans have their cake and eat it, too, when it comes to work/life balance.

One way to recharge is through grounding, or earthing, by walking barefoot in the sand. Grounding is said to reduce stress and tension levels. Glamping locations that allow plenty of silky, soft sand underfoot could include Oregon’s coastal getaway spots, cozy cabins at Pacific City and Seaside RV Resort. Another idea – combine grounding with the benefits of the relaxing colors of the tiny house rentals at Sunshine Key Tiny House Village in the Florida Keys and you’re well on the way to a destressing vacation. Plenty of sand for grounding or other fun can be found at Marina Dunes, which is adjacent to the Marina Dunes Preserve on California’s Monterey Peninsula. An ultra-cool glamping tent or high end cottage is the way to relax here.

How about a long weekend getaway that’s not too far from home, but far enough to leave the office woes behind? Is Seattle your place of business? Take a quick two-hour drive to Leavenworth, rent a tiny home at the Leavenworth Tiny House Village, and enjoy the outdoors. Fish, swim, hike, bike, or simply sip some wine in the Bavarian-styled village of Leavenworth. If Nashville is where you make the big bucks, take a break and head to the new Natchez Trace Tiny House Village. In a little over an hour, you can be relaxing in a perfectly appointed tiny house with lakefront views and fishing and hiking available onsite, plus the 3-mile lake here offers kayak and canoeing opportunities.

Lyla at Natchez Trace Tiny House Village
Lyla at Natchez Trace Tiny House Village

Speaking of water, blue space (lakes, rivers, oceans, even waterfalls) has been shown to lower stress and anxiety as well as boost mood and psychological well-being, per weforum.org. Rent a cabin at Wisconsin’s Neshonoc Lakeside Camping Resort or Lake George Escape, tucked away in New York’s Adirondacks, with the Queen of America’s Lakes as the centerpiece. Bend-Sunriver is a great place to soak up blue space healing power thanks to the location on the Little Deschutes River, and it offers cozy cabins and yurts.

Narrows Too Camping Resort
Narrows Too Camping Resort

Other destressing options for quick getaways or all those eight days can include forest-bathing (head to our favorite forested glamping options including Yosemite Lakes or our Bar Harbor resorts, Mt. Desert Narrows and Narrows Too). Forest-bathing requires you to take a walk in the woods and be mindful of your surroundings, engaging your senses and stopping every so often to just take it all in. Plus, we’ve got glamping options in the lands of the healing vortexes Arizona’s Red Rocks in Sedona or Joshua Tree National Park in California (check out tiny home or cabin rentals at Verde Valley or a colorful cottage at Palm Springs, respectively.) 

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Top Coaster Rides

The ups and downs you may have experienced this summer will feel like nothing once you take a ride on one of these roller coasters. August is National Roller Coaster Month, so we rounded up a few of the newest, oldest, and scariest to consider.

According to an article in USA Today, the best roller coasters of 2022 includes Steel Vengeance at Ohio’s Cedar Point. Opened in 2018, it is considered a “hyper-hybrid” coaster standing 205 feet tall and riding at a whopping 74 miles per hour. With over 5500 feet of track, which includes 30 seconds of airtime, this 2-minute ride is guaranteed to shake you up, just a bit! Plan to stay in a cabin at Kenisee Lake and you’re about 100 miles from Cedar Point.

Another USA Today list maker was the Jurassic World VelociCoaster at Universal’s Islands of Adventure in Florida. Four inversions, an 80-degree drop, 4,700 feet of track and oh, yeah, the simulated velociraptors, combine to make this one heart-stopping, stomach-dropping ride. Book a cabin or cottage rental at Orlando RV Resort or a colorful cottage at Tropical Palms and get ready to ride!

Deluxe Cabins at Pine Haven Campground, NJ
Deluxe Cabins at Pine Haven Campground, NJ

The Travel Channel has its own list of top coasters in the U.S. and they include El Toro at New Jersey’s Six Flags Great Adventure (but coincidentally was also named by USA Today as #1 in 2022. El Toro, which means the bull, is a wooden roller coaster that opened in 2006. It may be old by some standards, but it is mighty, as in mighty scary. The coaster ride starts with a 19-story climb only to drop 176 feet. It continues on, totaling one minute and forty-two seconds for the whole ride, through twists and turns and hills and valleys, just like any good bucking bull would as it tries to knock off a rider. Stay at any of our New Jersey locations to enjoy Six Flags Great Adventure.

Safari Tent at Morgan Hill Campgroud, CA
Safari Tent at Morgan Hill Campgroud, CA

Speaking of old, what about riding one of the oldest roller coasters in America? Head out for a glamping adventure at California’s Morgan Hill and head into Santa Cruz to ride the 98-year-old Giant Dipper at the Santa Cruz Boardwalk. Or, glamp at California’s Pio Pico RV Resort & Campground, just outside San Diego, to ride another nonagenarian coaster, also named the Giant Dipper and also 98-years-old, found in the city’s Belmont Park. They are still pretty swift for their age, each running at a speed of 55 miles per hour.

Giant Dipper Roller Coaster in San Diego, CA
Giant Dipper Roller Coaster in San Diego, CA

A newbie to the coaster world includes The Pantheon, which premiered this past March at Busch Gardens Williamsburg, billed as the world’s fastest multi-launch roller coaster and travels at a top speed of 73 miles per hour. Hold on to your hats, and togas, when riding this ride that is said to have the strength of the strongest Roman Gods. Book a stay in a cabin at Virginia’s Williamsburg Camping Resort when visiting Busch Gardens Williamsburg.

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5 Things to Do in Lake Tahoe

Lake Tahoe is an all-seasons destination thanks to the lovely lake and Sierra Nevada mountain range. Each season brings its own special touch to the area and summer is no exception. If Lake Tahoe is your summer getaway of choice, five things to consider are included here. First item to check off, however, is your glamping accommodations. Reserve a cabin or cottage at Tahoe Valley Campground and check out our ideas as well as many more things to do at visitinglaketahoe.com.

1. Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival: There’s more than just performances of Shakespeare to be found here. And yes, while July and August do offer regular performances of the Bard’s classic, “Much Ado About Nothing,” there’s also performances of “Mama Mia,” a variety of musical events featuring the Reno Philharmonic, Shakespeare for kids, and even a performance of the classic ballet, “Swan Lake” by the Sierra Nevada Ballet. This is a gorgeous outdoor venue where you’re surrounded by towering pines and mountain views. Food and drink are also available. Visit laketahoeshakespeare.com for info.

2. Most Beautiful Drive in America: Download the brochure from visitinglaketahoe.com and check out the mapped drive that guides you to the most scenic, historic and not-to-missed places in Lake Tahoe. Spots include Spooner Lake, which is great for fishing; Emerald Bay Lookout, one of the most photographed places and also provides a trail to Vikingsholm, Lake Tahoe’s hidden castle; and Squaw Valley, the site of the 1960 Winter Olympics.

Kayaking on Lake Tahoe
Kayaking on Lake Tahoe

3. Truckee: Truckee is an historic logging town less than 30 miles from Lake Tahoe. The Truckee River Trail is great for strolling, hiking, and biking with great views of wildflowers along the water. Floating and whitewater rafting expeditions can be found in Truckee (check out truckeeriverrafting.com or gowhitewater.com) and West End Beach, located on the Donner River, is a great place for kayak or paddleboard rentals or simply soaking up the sun on the 12-acre beach. Museums include the Truckee Railroad Museum and the museum at the Donner Memorial State Park. Downtown Truckee offers restaurants, shops, and craft brew and wine options. BTW – Truckee derives from the Piaute Indian word “trokay” which means “everything is alright.”

4. The Potholes: Check this out for an unusual way to take a dip in the water when visiting the Lake Tahoe area. Thanks to the way the Silver Fork of the American River flows and the granite fields found here, the water drops off and creates swimming pools, or holes. Experience them from atop a granite boulder perch or dip in and enjoy the cool waters. To find the potholes, you need to hike a bit but they are worth it. Visit aboutlaketahoe.com/hiking/potholes to learn more about them and to find directions.

5. Fun with Food and Drink: Tahoe Tastings (tahoetastings.com) offers a completely different kind of wine tasting experience with cruises around Lake Tahoe while tasting wines from area wineries. Several foodie tours are available (tahoefoodietour.com) while top restaurants include Zephyr Cove Restaurant and Chambers Landing Bar and Grill, which is the oldest bar on the water in Lake Tahoe and offers food and drink, including the famous Chambers Punch.

Pool at Tahoe Valley Campground
Pool at Tahoe Valley Campground

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5 Great July Getaways

According to globalgrasshopper.com (a blog team that consists of “self-confessed travel snobs), the locations listed below are some of the best places to travel to in July. Luckily, the fabulous Petite Retreats glamping accommodations in these locations provide the perfect complement to have one of the best July trips you’ve ever taken!

Citing the idyllic back drop of Frenchman’s Bay, the top-notch eateries and the charm of the downtown area, Bar Harbor, Maine made the list. Make a reservation at either Mt. Desert Narrows or Narrows Too and get set for a New England destination full of food, fun, and outdoor activity. Highlights of a Bar Harbor getaway include Acadia National Park; whale-watching excursions; several history museums and lots of shopping. For something different, consider Diver Ed’s Dive-in Theater (diveintheater.com), which offers a great way to learn about the sea creatures that reside here.

On the other coast – Pacific, that is – the “travel snobs” believe Cannon Beach, Oregon, is a great July pick for a trip due to the stunning scenery and sea life that can be seen here at this time. Toss in the great pics you can take of Haystack Rock with a summer sky backdrop and that’s reason enough. If you need more, there’s the Cannon Beach Farmers Market, which runs every Tuesday; the “BUSKERS in the Park” Thursday night concerts in the City Park, craft brews from Cannon Beach brewpubs, Pelican Brewing Company and Public Coast Brewing, plus outdoor activities that include surfing, fishing, hiking, and plenty of nature walks. Reserve a cabin at Seaside and explore this Pacific Coast gem.

Cabin at Seaside RV Campround
Cabin at Seaside RV Campround

Is there a bad time to visit Monterey, California? We doubt it, but according to globalgrasshopper, Monterey is great in July thanks to the temperature and al fresco dining opportunities. Renting the glamping tent or cottage at Marina Dunes is also perfect in July, so stay with us while you explore July in Monterey. The Monterey Scottish Games and Celtic Festival is set for the weekend of July 16-17 and the 19th Monterey Beer Festival is set for Saturday, July 30. More fun in Monterey includes visits to the charming seaside village of Carmel-by-the-Sea; the Monterey Bay Aquarium, and the stunningly scenic 17-Mile-Drive. Oh, and by the way, al fresco dining options can include Abalonetti Bar & Grill and Loulou’s Griddle in the Middle.

Looking to go lakeside? Book a cottage complete with a screened-in porch at Kenisee Lake and head to charming Geneva-on-the-Lake. The lake here is Lake Erie and the quaint town is billed as “Ohio’s First Summer Resort.” The blogging travel snobs like this location because of the numerous lakeside beaches, the zip lines and adventure courses, and the local breweries and wineries. The Vines and Wines Trail has over 30 wineries and vineyards and details can be found at ohiowines.org. The Strip, the town’s version of a boardwalk, is home to shops and restaurants, and other fun attractions like a mini-golf course. Breakwater Beach is great for beach lovers and Geneva State Park will provide a great fix for hiking enthusiasts. Lake Erie Canopy Tours (lakeeriecanopytours.com) receives high praise from users for its patient and professional guides as well as the variety of course options.

Cottage at Kenisee Lake RV Campground
Cottage at Kenisee Lake RV Campground

Historic Boston makes the list and that’s fitting since they really know how to celebrate Independence Day. Aside from the big party on the 4th, Boston is noted for the concerts at the Hatch Shell and Shakespeare on the Common, both free events in July, whale watching and the food and craft beer scene. There are also baseball games at Fenway Park, the historic and very walkable Freedom Trail, harbor cruises, and some of the best Italian dining to be found in the North End (don’t miss the cannoli from Mike’s Pastry)! The Rose Kennedy Greenway is another place where you can always find something going on, including Greenway Food Trucks where over 35 food trucks offer all kinds of specialties from seafood to Korean options daily; a farmer’s market each Tuesday and Thursday and a beer and wine garden. Book a stay at either Sturbridge or Gateway to Cape Cod and head into Boston to discover a great summertime city.

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Eat, Glamp, Repeat

Whether you’re a foodie or not, the number of “national” days recognized for different foods practically requires that you eat your way through the month. July has multiple days dedicated to foods like hot dogs and lasagna and we’ve rounded up some of the best places serving up July’s food favorites. Pair them with the perfect glamping location and you’ll be asking for more, please!

National Fried Chicken Day: That’s July 6 so we suggest you head to a few of these places named by Food & Wine as serving some of the best fried chicken in the U.S. Book a tiny home at Natchez Trace and head into Nashville to try the chicken at Hattie B’s which according to the magazine is the best “old-school hot-chicken place in town.” There’s also a tiny house at Natchez Trace named Hattie – a match made in heaven. Another option and another Hattie’s (although not related) is a Hattie’s in Saratoga Springs, New York. Rent a cabin at Lake George Escape and enjoy the roughly 30-minute drive to this establishment that has served up fried chicken since 1938.

National Lasagna Day: Winding up the month of food celebrations, National Lasagna Day falls on July 29 so you’ve got all month to eat this tasty Italian dish that dates to the Middle Ages before its official day. The dailymeal.com ranked some of America’s best lasagna and several are convenient to our glamping locations. Here are a few dinner/glamping combos: Seattle’s Pink Door (#3) and a yurt at Tall Chief; Miami’s Macchialina (#9) and a cabin at Miami Everglades; and Kenny’s Italian Kitchen in Dallas (#22), an old-school, home-style eatery complete with red-checked tablecloths pairs well with a cabin rental at Bay Landing in nearby Bridgeport.

Yurt at Tall Chief Campground
Yurt at Tall Chief Campground

National Hot Dog Day: There’s plenty of ambiguity surrounding how the hot dog came to be called just that, but there’s no dispute that these little sandwiches are a delight whatever condiment you believe belongs on them! July 20 is the day the dog is honored this year and good spots to eat and glamp include: Soledad Canyon (cabin or cottage rental) and LA’s Pink’s Hot Dogs with its variety of celebrity named hot dogs; Wilmington RV Resort (cabin or cottage rental) and a hot dog, brat, or sausage from Avril Bleh’s Meat Market and Deli in downtown Cincinnati, or Cherokee Landing (cabin rental) and Payne’s in Memphis – which while known for BBQ also serves up a good hot dog.

Cottage at Wilmington RV Campground
Cottage at Wilmington RV Campground

For dessert: The sweeter things in life are also celebrated in July and they include National Pecan Pie Day on July 12 (rent a tiny home at Tuxbury Tiny House Village and head to Nashua’s Willie Jewel’s Old School Bar-B-Q for a piece of pie); National Milk Chocolate Day – rent a cottage at Hershey RV and eat all the milk chocolate you want at nearby Hershey’s Chocolate World; or to sample the red velvet cheesecake at Boston’s 7ate9 Bakery consider glamping at either Sturbridge or Gateway to Cape Cod. And the cherry on top – National Cheesecake Day is July 30!

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5 Things to Do in Gettysburg

Planning a trip to Pennsylvania this summer? If you are, don’t forget to visit historic Gettysburg. In addition to the Battlefield sites, there is a lot more to do in this little piece of Pennsylvania. First things first – book a cabin stay at Drummer Boy Camping Resort. With 95 wooded acres and just minutes from downtown Gettysburg, it’s the perfect spot to soak up nature, history and all the reasons why more than 1 million people visit here each year. Drummer Boy has great cabin and cottage accommodations, a pool and onsite fishing opportunities, and is close to everything. Or, cozy up in a cabin at Round Top Campground, located 15 minutes from downtown Gettysburg. Once you’re settled, here are 5 things you don’t want to miss.

Gettysburg National Military Park and Museum: The site of the 1863 battle which was considered the turning point of the Civil War, the museum provides visitors with so much up-close-and-personal history from the battlefield tour to the exhibits, films, and memorabilia available through the Films, Cyclorama, and Museum Experience. Living History program tours are available weekends from June 10-12 through August 14-16. Children of Gettysburg is a new family-friendly program that provides insight as to what it was like for a child living near the battle. For details, visit gettysburgfoundation.org.

The National Apple Museum: An interesting museum where visitors can learn all about the apple and fruit tree industry in Adams County. FYI, apples are the state’s fourth largest agricultural commodity and Pennsylvania is the fourth-largest apple producing state. The museum includes an assortment of antique picking and harvesting equipment as well as farm implements and a replica of an 1880s kitchen. There is an 18-minute video, “Apples, Apples, Apples.” A summer concert series runs on Friday nights through September 2. There’s also an orchard and gift shop. For information, visit nationalapplemuseum.com.

Cabin at Drummer Boy Camping Resort
Cabin at Drummer Boy Camping Resort

Tours, Tours, and More Tours: Check the website at gettysburgghosttours.com and you’ll find a whole lot more than just ghost tours. There’s the Lincoln Tour which follows the steps of President Abraham Lincoln when he visited Gettysburg to deliver the now famous Gettysburg Address. There’s also the Craft Beer and Spirits Tour which incorporates history, ghost stories and, of course, spirits of the drinking variety. Another fun tour is the Walking Tour of the Taverns of Gettysburg which includes Civil War history, details about the Temperance societies in Gettysburg, and more unusual but true stories. A great site for tours in the area is gbltg.com.

Battle of Gettysburg Anniversary: On July 2, an all-day event to commemorate the 159th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg will be held at the historic Daniel Lady Farm. The event will feature living history activities, battle reenactments, cavalry demonstrations, and tours of the historic house and barn. Visit gbpa.org for details.

The Historic Round Barn and Farm Market: First off, one reason to visit is that this is one of the last surviving round barns in the U.S. Secondly, the fruit and veggies available here, which include apples, peaches, strawberries, tomatoes and more, are amazing. Plus, there are also baked goods to take back to camp from pies to muffins to breads, all sourced locally. And once you’ve eaten your fill and bought all you can, take a minute to just bask in the beauty of the rolling hills of the scenic Pennsylvania countryside. For information and Barn hours, visit roundbarn.farm.

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June is Great Outdoors Month

June is Great Outdoors Month and while the event was designed to get people outside, if you love to glamp, most likely your focus on the great outdoors is a year-round thing. Still, it’s always a great idea to enjoy the outdoors and glamping in June is a great start. We found a few more motivators for some solid outdoor adventure this June.

Glamping in Chehalis, Washington
Glamping in Chehalis, Washington

Camping has been a popular outdoor activity for ages (after all, it was the only way to live for millions of years). As for recreational camping, the early 1920s seem to be the start as Americans ventured out from their neighborhoods and found camping a wonderful way to see the world. After World War II, camping became much more popular and camping equipment became much more accessible. Recently, the term glamping has been making waves and it’s the perfect combination of living the outdoor lifestyle surrounded by beautiful scenery, while still having the creature comforts of the great indoors. Our resorts offer unique rental accommodations like tiny homes and cabins, have plenty of amenities, are in great locations, and many are pet friendly. No “roughing it” required. Visit petiteretreats.com to see where you want to glamp during Great Outdoors Month.

According to statista.com, in 2020, approximately 63 million Americans hiked, making hiking the second most popular outdoor activity, second only to running. Hiking has great benefits for both mind and spirit. Why not book a Petite Retreats glamping accommodation and hit the hiking trails this June? Consider a tiny house in Leavenworth, a cozy cabin in Wisconsin at Yukon Trails, or a colorful cottage by the water in the Florida Keys. Hikes can include Bygone Byways in Leavenworth, Witches Gulch in Wisconsin’s Upper Dells, or the Hammock Trail in The Keys’ Windley Key Fossil Reef Geological State Park.

Dark Sky at Joshua Tree National Park
Dark Sky at Joshua Tree National Park

Enjoy the great outdoors under the cover of night at a Dark Sky Park. Certified Dark Sky Parks can be found in Florida at the Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park (stay at colorful cottage at Tropical Palms); Joshua Tree National Park in California (book a cabin or cottage rental at Palm Springs RV Resort); Lyndon B. Johnson State Park (book a cabin rental at Medina Lake in Lakehills, Texas or a tiny house at Verde Valley near Sedona, Arizona). Dark Sky Parks are known to have exceptional quality when it comes to starry nights so here’s to happy stargazing! More ideas for outdoor fun include marathon outdoor scavenger hunts, biking, birding, volunteering for outdoor cleanups, fishing, boating, swimming, paddling, canoeing – the list proves there’s no shortage of ways to enjoy Great Outdoors Month. Don’t waste a minute of your June indoors – book your stay, go glamping, and enjoy the great outdoors!

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3 of the Best Glamping Accommodations for Summer

We all know the popularity of camping has taken off in the past few years and more people are camping than ever before. And of course, glamping has gone from a little know activity to being the “only way to camp” for some. So, what’s the difference? In reality, you’re still camping but glamping notches up the accommodations for sure. Check out some of the best glamping accommodations offered by Petite Retreats.

Yurt at Tranquil Timbers Campground
Yurt at Tranquil Timbers Campground
  1. Yurts: These circular domed tents date back to the 5th century and the word yurt actually translates to “home” in many languages. Yurts are spacious yet cozy and the yurts at Petite Retreat locations have kitchens and TVs –  just like home! Yurt glamping opportunities can be found in California, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Washington, and Wisconsin. Make it a beach experience and rent a yurt at Oregon’s Pacific City or a wooded wilderness adventure at Wisconsin’s Tranquil Timbers, on the state’s magnificent Door County Peninsula.

  2. Tiny Homes: Tiny homes are exactly that – all the comforts of home but just consolidated into 200 to 350 square feet! The tinies at Petite Retreats locations are decorated straight out of a magazine, located in some of the most popular vacation destinations, and really provide one of the best glamping experiences you may ever have. Our tiny homes have kitchens, bathrooms and sleeping lofts as well as plenty of space for indoor living when you’re done with outdoor adventure. From a location standpoint, renting a tiny home near Nashville, Tennessee, the beaches of New Hampshire or the Florida Keys, the woodsy Pacific Northwest, or the gorgeous Arizona Red Rock Canyon are all possibilities.

  1. Completely Unique: Have you ever camped in a covered wagon? Or a real glamping tent? Check out these unique accommodations at Petite Retreats.

The Glamping Tents, located at beautiful Marina Dunes, have queen-sized beds, two bedside tables with lamps, and cozy outdoor spaces, too. With a glamping tent, it’s like spending the night in your own bedroom. No need to pitch a tent or blow up the air mattress. When you’re done with the day, settle into bed, switch off the lamp and enjoy a comfortable sleep with the moon and stars as nightlights. Marina Dunes is adjacent to the Marina Dunes Preserve and a short drive to Monterey, where attractions include Cannery Row, the Monterey Bay Aquarium and Old Fisherman’s Wharf.

The Covered Wagon option is the perfect accommodation when you choose to glamp at Rancho Oso in Santa Barbara. Bedding down in the Covered Wagon at this western-ranch style campground will make you feel like you’ve gone back in time, except you have electricity. The Covered Wagon has camping cots and plenty of outdoor space for activities, including the glamping favorite: a campfire. Other unique accommodations at Rancho Oso include a tipi and western-style cabins. This is a fantastic location if you want to go to the beach, explore the wine country here, or beautiful downtown Santa Barbara. The campground itself offers a Western Village and horseback riding.

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