Spirits in the Night, or Day if you prefer!

If you’re looking for a spirited adventure this fall but haunted houses and ghost tours aren’t really your thing, consider seeking spirits of a different kind. We’re talking about the kind of spirits you can drink, and you don’t need complicated equipment to find them. Simply check out these distilleries below to find the kinds of spirits that will keep you in good spirits!

Trinity River Distillery, Fort Worth TX:  Housed in an historic landmark dating back to 1913, this distillery uses natural rainwater in their distilling process. Tours are just $10 per person and include samples of the distillery’s products which include Silver Star Vodka, Silver Star Whiskey and Silver Star Texas Honey Liquor. After the tour, enjoy some specialty drinks at the bar like the Silver Stargarita, the Texas Honey Mule, or the Toxic Whiskey. www.trinityriverdistillery.com

(Cozy cabins at Bay Landing are less than 50 miles from the distillery)

Cannon Beach Distillery, Cannon Beach, OR:  The spirits produced here are about as homegrown as you can get. Every liquor produced is done so on site – from fermentation to bottling. Considered an artisanal distillery, the batches are small and not mass produced so a trip to the tasting room is the only way you are likely to taste what they have to offer. Sadly, they are closing up shop within the year, but they are still open and plan to release four whiskeys before year-end. www.cannonbeachdistillery.com

(Cabins and yurts at Pacific City are about an hour from Cannon Beach)

Sound Spirits Distillery, Seattle, WA: Located under the Ballard Bridge in Seattle, Sound Spirits offers tours of the distillery which produces some unique liquor varieties including aquavit and herbal liqueurs, as well as gin and whiskey. www.drinksoundspirits.com

(Cabins and yurts at Tall Chief is about 35 minutes from the distillery)

Lost Spirits Distillery, Los Angeles, CA:  According to reviews, this is more than just a tour and tasting, and is instead akin to an adult version of the tour portrayed in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Tours are $37 per person and reservations are required, but the experience is well worth it. A mix of science and spirits with a special “ride” to reach the tour are all part of the fun, not to mention the whiskey and rum tastings. www.lostspirits.net

Palm Springs Oasis
Colorful cottages at Palm Springs, less than two hours from Lost Spirits Distillery.

Goleta Red Distilling Company, Goleta, CA:  Rum is the spirit of choice here with three different varieties as well as a rum liqueur, but they also have gin and a “Fiesta” Agave Spirit, too! The tasting room is open Wednesdays through Sundays and you can also enjoy cocktails on the patio at this very welcome addition to the fun found in Santa Barbara. www.goletared.com

Rancho Oso
Cozy cabins, teepees, and covered wagons at Rancho Oso are less than 30 miles from Goleta Red Distilling Company.

Florida Distillery Trail, Various Locations:  Follow the Florida Distillery Trail which runs across and around the state offering roughly 15 distilleries to visit. These distilleries offer everything from rum to whiskey to moonshine. Florida Cane Distillery, in Tampa, offers not only tours, but also a Distillery After Dark option where you can mix your own signature cocktail or a 3-day Whiskey Workshop that offers insight to whiskey making (www.floridacane.com). In Sarasota, award-winning Siesta Key rum flows at the Drum Circle Distillery where tours are free and the tasting room is open seven days a week (www.siestakeyrum.com). Down in the Keys, enjoy a free tour at Key West First Legal Rum Distillery (keywestlegalrum.com) or visit (by appointment only) Key West Distilling which offers craft distilled rum, vodka, gin, and whiskey (www.keywestdistilling.com).

Tropical Palms
Colorful cottages from Tropical Palms, about one hour from Loggerhead Distillery along the Florida Distillery Trail near Orlando.

(Petite Retreats locations near the Tampa and Sarasota distilleries include Tropical Palms, Orlando, and Peace River while Sunshine Key is near the Key West locations)

Can You Dig It? A short guide to fossil hunting sites in the US

Yaquina Head Lighthouse
Yaquina Head Lighthouse in Newport, Oregon.

October 16 is National Fossil Day, which was established to promote the scientific and educational value of fossils. According to the National Geographic Society, a fossil is the preserved remains, or traces of remains, of ancient animals or plants. They are important in helping us discover the evolution of life and how life was lived thousands and thousands of years ago. Most fossils are formed when a plant or animal dies in a watery location and becomes buried in silt or mud. Celebrate National Fossil Day this year and see what treasures you can unearth. We’ve listed a few well-known fossil hunting sites here.

Capitola Beach, in Capitola, California, is a great spot to hunt for fossils during low tide. This little beach town can offer the motherlode of fossils thanks to the Purisima Formation, a geologic formation which preserves fossils from the Late Miocene and Early Pleistocene Era. Bones of whales and seals, as well as sea urchins and bivalves, and been unearthed here along with the rare shark tooth.

The fossilized bones of a mastodon, a camel, and a mammoth have turned up in Florida’s Peace River which has also revealed plenty of shark teeth, some as large as seven inches. Collecting shark teeth does not require a permit but if you’re digging for anything bigger, you need both a boat and a permit. There are plenty of guided tours available or you can go it alone, wading into the river from any of the public landings – but be aware of all the living flora and fauna!

Chesapeake Bay
Cozy cabins from Chesapeake Bay, about an hour from Westmoreland State Park.

Beverly Beach State Park in Newport, Oregon, is a beautiful beach with rock formations dating back millions of years that are filled with fossils. Winter is the best time for fossil hunting here thanks to the storms that dislodge several layers of sandstone unearthing new (old!) fossils. Petrified wood, dating back some 15-20 million years, and agate stones can also be found here.

Mineral Wells Fossil Park, in Mineral Wells, Texas, has an abundance of “Pennsylvanian Period” fossils, which date back some 318 million years! Thanks in part due to the erosion of the city’s borrow pit (which is a spot where material has been dug out for use at another location), fossils of ancient sea species have been found here which have included primitive sharks, brachiopods (marine animals in hard shells), crinoids (sea lilies), and pelecypods (clams and oysters).

Westmoreland State Park in Montross, Virginia, is a well-known location for fossil hunting and has been known to turn up shark teeth, whale teeth, and fish bones and vertebrae dating to the Miocene Age. There is a portion of the park known as Fossil Beach and it’s a great place to find shark teeth, including those of the megalodon. Situated between two towering bluffs, the beach is a short walk from the Visitors Center, and here you can sift through the sand using a colander or sand sifter (no major equipment allowed).

Pacific City • IG: @ofwildestheart
Yurt interior photo from Pacific City near Beverly Beach State Park. IG: @ofwildestheart

In and Around New Hampshire’s Tuxbury Pond

Tuxbury Tiny House Village
Tuxbury Tiny House Village

The month of September not only includes fall foliage in the Northeast but also commemorates National New Hampshire Day, which recognizes the 9th state to join the Union. So, if you want to celebrate New Hampshire or are planning a fall getaway to The Granite State, consider a stay at the Tuxbury Tiny House Village in South Hampton and check out some of these fun events scheduled in and around the area. The Tuxbury Tiny House Village is the perfect place to make your home base as you explore New England in autumn. Five tiny houses, Emerson, Henry, Clara, Riley, and Murphy, are available for you to choose from. Cozy sleeping lofts, full bathrooms, and kitchens are part of the tiny house charm here. Visit www.tuxburytinyhouse.com to see which one is best for you!

Photo courtesy of @kerriemburke
Photo courtesy of @kerriemburke

Alnoba Arts Park Tours (September and October, various dates): Tour the amazing collection of art that you can touch, lean on, and climb on! An amazing sculpture garden experience awaits! Visit www.alnoba.org for details.

 Cider Hills Farms (throughout September and October): Enjoy a day of fall fun at this 145-acre farm in Amesbury, Massachusetts. It’s harvest time for peaches and raspberries (September) as well as apples and pumpkins (October). Take a tour of the farm or sample some cider (Saturday and Sundays only). There is a lot going on here! Visit www.ciderhill.com for more information.

Tuxbury Tiny House Village • Interior Emerson
Tuxbury Tiny House Village • Interior Emerson

Jazz Along the Charles (September 23): Head into Boston for the day and enjoy more than 25 jazz ensembles playing along Boston’s Esplanade between 2 and 4 p.m. Enjoy the crisp fall air and some lively jazz tunes with Boston-related themes. For information, visit www.jazzalongthecharles.org.

Portsmouth Maritime Folk Festival (September 28): The 20th annual event brings music of the sea to the streets of Portsmouth. Folk performers are showcased at more than a dozen venues throughout the town. The event will culminate with a “public sing” on Sunday. For information, visit www.pmffest.org.

Tuxbury Tiny House Village
Tuxbury Tiny House Village

South Hampton Fall Festival (October 5): All kinds of fall fun including a car show, live music, vendors, games, food, drinks and a chili and soup cook-off! Event runs from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in South Hampton (on Hilldale Avenue).

NH Pumpkin Festival (October 18-19): Held in Laconia, this two-day festival is all about the pumpkin with jack-o-lantern carving, food, craft vendors, live music, kids’ activities, hayrides and a beer garden. For information, visit www.nhpumpkinfestival.com

Halloween Pumpkin Festival (October 19): Festival goers can wear Halloween costumes and float their own hollowed-out pumpkin on Frog Pond at Boston Commons to celebrate the holiday. This free event also includes music, refreshments, a haunted maze and lots of children’s activities. Check out www.bostonfrogpond.com for more details. Don’t miss a minute of fall fun in and around South Hampton! Visit TuxburyTinyHouse.com to reserve your very own tiny house surrounded by fall colors.

Tuxbury Tiny House Village
Tuxbury Tiny House Village

Cider Sippin’ Spots

Cider Sippin’ Spots

When they say everything old is new again, they may very well be talking about cider. Did you know cider was America’s beverage of choice during Colonial times? In fact, the Mayflower possibly carried the first cider press to be used in America aboard the ship that also brought the Pilgrims to our shores. Of course, they couldn’t do anything with it until the apples were harvested from the first apple trees planted here after they first landed. Fast forward some 500 years, and cider is again very popular. To clarify, that’s hard cider versus soft cider. The difference here being that hard cider has an alcohol content while soft cider can be enjoyed by all ages! And, while Americans may not be drinking the 35 gallons of hard cider they apparently averaged annually during Colonial days, they are certainly taking it up once again, as evidenced by the popularity of cideries sprouting up across the country. To produce cider, according to ciderscene.com, there are four steps. Pick, press, punish, and produce. Again, a differentiation is required. The apples used for cider are typically not the same apples that you would eat or cook with. Cider apples tend to be dryer and less sweet. The four-step result is a crisp, refreshing alternative to other spirits, including beer and wine. Here are some cideries to check out this fall season:

Bishop Cider (Dallas, Texas):  Gluten-free and vegan friendly, the people behind Bishop Cider began making their own cider at home because they felt the commercially available cider in Texas was “trash” because it was too sweet. Started in 2014, Bishop Cider Co. now offers a variety of ciders and has a tasting room that typically offers six different ciders on tap. For more information, and to check out the unique Cidercade, visit www.bishopcider.com.

Bay Landing • Bridgeport, TX
Bay Landing • Bridgeport, TX

(Nearest Petite Retreat option is Bay Landing in Bridgeport, about 80 miles away)

Cider Bite (Portland, Oregon): Another cidery that grew from the idea that there was just no place to get good cider, the Cider Bite bills itself as a Cider House and focuses not only on making exceptional cider, but also on the history and production of cider. In fact, founder Jeff Hanneson’s great-grandfather was a cider-maker. Offering 32 ciders on tap, cider flights, and nibbles, the Cider Bite is the place to get your cider cravings satisfied. Visit www.ciderbite.com for more information.

Mt Hood • Welches, OR
Mt Hood • Welches, OR

 (Nearest Petite Retreat option is Mt. Hood in Welches, about 36 miles away)

Santa Barbara Cider Company (Santa Barbara, California): Come visit and see what’s on tap for the day as they offer 12 rotating taps of their delicious cider varieties which may include a coffee-based cider, a tea-infused cider, or one of several fruit ciders. All ciders are gluten-free and the cider makers say the majority of the ingredients they use can be found in your own kitchen cabinets, like cinnamon and brown sugar. They do have a tasting room and food trucks and other food providers are on hand during the weekends for nourishment while enjoying the cider offerings. For more information, visit www.sbcider.com.

Rancho Oso • Santa Barbara, CA
Rancho Oso • Santa Barbara, CA

 (Nearest Petite Retreat option is Rancho Oso, about 30 miles away)

Island Orchard Cider (Ellison Bay, Wisconsin): Visit the Tasting Room and Cider Pub in beautiful Door County, Wisconsin, where you can see the cider making process as well as enjoy the flavors of Island Orchard. Visit www.islandorchardcider.com for more information.

(Nearest Petite Retreat option is Tranquil Timbers in Sturgeon Bay, about 36 miles away)

Give me a T for Texas, and for Tennessee!

Natchez Trace • Hohenwald, TN
Natchez Trace • Hohenwald, TN

The only states that start with T in the list of fifty, nifty United States, both Tennessee and Texas have a variety of reasons to visit them. Tennessee comes first in terms of being admitted to the Union, which happened on June 1, 1796, making it the 16th state (it was also the last state to leave the Union during the Civil War, as well as the first state readmitted toward the end of the war). Texas was the 28th state admitted in 1845, however, Texas comes first in size. As the second biggest state, Texas measures in at a whopping 268,581 square miles while Tennessee comes in 34th at 41,220 square miles (Texas can fit about six Tennessees in it!). But, when it comes to things to do and see, they are pretty equal!

Music: In terms of music destinations, Texas has Austin while Tennessee can boast both Nashville and Memphis. Nashville has the Ryman Auditorium, which was the original home of the Grand Ole Opry, a space that helped launch many music careers including Johnny Cash, Dolly Parton, and Loretta Lynn.  There is also the new location of the Grand Ole Opry at Opryland, which is just a few miles outside the city. The city is also home to countless honky tonks where singer-songwriters play in hopes of achieving their dreams. The District is where you can listen to music to your heart’s content with its lively nightlife scene.

Lake Whitney • Whitney, TX
Lake Whitney • Whitney, TX

 Memphis is home to Beale Street, a major tourist attraction that has been designated as a national historic landmark and is lined with blues clubs and BBQ joints. Memphis is also where Elvis got his break at Sun Studio, which is still standing and offers tours of the place where he was first recorded. Of course, there is also Graceland, Elvis’ mansion, another major tourist attraction chock full of Elvis paraphernalia. Austin, Texas, is known for its two major annual music festivals: South by Southwest, held in March, and Austin City Limits, held in October. The city also has a vibrant music any day of the week. There are more than 250 live music venues offering everything from classical and jazz to rock, blues, and country.

Lake Conroe • Willis, TX
Lake Conroe • Willis, TX

History Both states are rich in history – Texas history can be traced back to the early 1500s with the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors while British traders came upon a Cherokee town called “Tanasi” in the early 1700s. In terms of famous battles, Texas has the Alamo while Tennessee has the infamous Civil War event, the Battle of Shiloh. Visitors can see the site of the Alamo which is located in the heart of San Antonio. The 300-year-old Spanish Mission is open to the public and battlefield tours are available. Shiloh National Military Park, operated by the National Park Service, can be toured through both ranger-guided and self-guided options. It is considered one of the best preserved and most pristine of the Civil War Battlefields. Dallas has the unfortunate history of being the city where President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. Visitors can tour The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza which chronicles the events of that fateful day in November through exhibits and historic displays.

 Must-Sees Don’t miss the River Walk in San Antonio, Texas Hill Country, and Big Bend National Park in Texas. In Tennessee, must-sees include the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, and Nashville’s Centennial Park with its replica of the original Parthenon in Greece. (Petite Retreats can be found at Bay Landing in Bridgeport, Texas, which is outside of Dallas, and Natchez Trace in Hohenwald, Tennessee, which is an hour and a half outside of Nashville and three hours outside of Memphis. Colorado River and Medina Lake are near Austin and San Antonio.)

Medina Lake • Lakehills, TX
Medina Lake • Lakehills, TX

Why Go Outside?

La Conner • La Conner, WA

When you were young, were your parents constantly telling you to “go outside and play” anytime you were sulking, acting up, acting bored, wandering aimlessly around the house, or rummaging through the kitchen cabinets?

Well, they were onto something there! Studies have shown time and again the benefits of being outside are countless. According to Mental Floss magazine, there are scientific reasons why being outside is great for you. It can give you an energy and immune system boost, enhance creativity, and restore your focus. It can even make you a better person. According to Mental Floss, psychologists say that exposure to nature helps us shrug off societal pressures, allowing us to remember and value more important things like relationships, sharing, and community.

Here’s another interesting factoid about the benefits of being outdoors, specifically in the forest or wooded areas. A Japanese study shows that “shinrin-yoku” or “forest- bathing” is considered a form of preventative medicine. Forest-bathing can be accomplished by taking a short walk through a densely wooded area, such as your local woods or a wooded park area. But think about glamping in a forest setting! Boom – you just got a double dose of that preventative medicine!

Tiny House • Mt Hood Village • Welches, OR

Getting out of doors can be as simple as taking a walk around the block. But we know that glamping, thanks to the requirement of being outdoors to do it, is a wonderful way to reap the benefits of being outside.

Some of the specific benefits of glamping and camping include:

  1. Socialization
  2. Stress Reduction­­
  3. Physical Exercise
  4. Plenty of sunshine, thereby increasing your Vitamin D intake
  5. Connecting with nature

Here are few ideas to make sure you reap those benefits when you glamp.

Go Hiking: you’ve already taken care of Numbers 3 and 5, and Number 2, as well, as the activity will naturally decrease your stress level.

Experience Campfire Camaraderie: Next time you glamp, make sure that campfire time includes the opportunity for sharing with your glamping buddies. Whether it’s recipes, stories or a just a recount of the day’s highlights – listen and connect. Doing this takes care of Number 1 on the list. Another great way to socialize while glamping is to take part in the locally scheduled activities. You’re sure to meet some locals, too!

Another benefit of glamping is that it very possibly gets your circadian rhythm in sync. The circadian clock is a natural internal cycle that regulates your sleep-wake time. Studies have shown that just a few days of glamping can reset your clock allowing you to get more sleep. And, it’s no secret that lack of sleep can lead to all kinds of health problems including diabetes and heart disease.

Alpine Lake RV Resort • Corinth, NY

The reset has to do with trading out artificial light for natural light which is typical when glamping and the fact that your body produces melatonin, which is integral to a good night’s sleep, when it’s dark. Think of how dark your room was last time you glamped!

Lots of melatonin being produced, we’re sure.

So, let’s give a pat on the back to parents everywhere who are telling their kids right now to go outside. They know what they’re talking about.

And by the way, go outside!

Bend-Sunriver • Bend, OR

51 Days and Counting

Circle M • Lancaster, PA

As of August 1, there are only 51 days left of summer, according to the calendar. For some, summer ends when school starts, but the official calendar date is September 21, which is the first day of autumn. Time flies, especially summertime, whether you’re having fun or not.

Bend-Sunriver • Bend, OR

We’ve put together 50 fun things to do before we say farewell to summer. (We’re giving you one day to read this list and create an action plan!)

  1. Go to a waterpark
  2. Read at least one book from your summer booklist
  3. Eat outdoors
  4. Go fishing
  5. Try to learn a new watersport, like stand-up paddling or wake surfing
  6. Go to a local pool and enjoy getting splashed
  7. Visit a lemonade stand
  8. Watch the sun rise
  9. Watch the sun set
  10. Camp out in your backyard
  11. Glamp at your favorite Petite Retreats location
  12. Enter a watermelon seed spitting contest
  13. Take in a theater production under the stars
  14. Spend one day off grid – no social media, no TV, no podcasts (best paired with #11!)
  15. Catch fireflies
  16. Bird watch
  17. Take a walk in the woods
  18. Visit a farmer’s market and create something delicious with seasonal produce
  19. Make s’mores and then make more
  20. Enjoy an outdoor musical event
  21. Build a sandcastle
  22. Go to a carnival
  23. Ride a rollercoaster and scream at the top of your lungs
  24. Run through a sprinkler, even if it’s someone else’s!
  25. Listen to the crickets
  26. Pick berries
  27. Go to a baseball game – local or professional
  28. Eat corn on the cob
  29. Take a road trip (for as long as you can)
  30. Visit a national park
  31. Visit a national monument
  32. Visit an old friend
  33. Spend a day volunteering
  34. Spend a day watching old movies
  35. Go to a drive-in movie
  36. Grab some chalk and make sidewalk masterpieces
  37. Have a water balloon fight
  38. Have a squirt gun fight
  39. Fly a kite
  40. Try Goat Yoga
  41. Spend a day being a tourist in your own city
  42. Catch a parade
  43. Go on a picnic
  44. Visit a planetarium and enjoy summer’s night skies
  45. Eat popsicles
  46. Grill the perfect hotdog/hamburger
  47. See this summer’s blockbuster movie at a midnight showing
  48. Carefully enjoy a slip ‘n slide
  49. Glamp in a unique accommodation – yurt, teepee, tiny house
  50. Make a to-do list for next summer!

Goat Yoga

Oregon Coast Summer Events

New Pacific City • Cloverdale, OR

The Oregon Coast stretches 363 miles from Astoria in the north to the California border in the south. It can easily be navigated via U.S. Route 101 that meanders through big towns, little towns, beach towns, and historic towns. If you’re planning a road trip along the Oregon Coast in the next month or so, here are few events you’ll want to check out.

Every Saturday in August, Newport Farmer’s Market
Fresh flowers, fruit, plants, honey, coffee, and more, plus live music. Over 60 vendors bring their summer offerings. Held at the Newport City Hall from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

August 7-10, Tillamook County Fair
What’s more fun than a county fair with its carnival rides, livest­­ock events, silly contests such as the Ugliest Cake, and serious ones like Tillamook’s Got Talent, and, of course, all that yummy fair food. For details, visit www.tillamookfair.com.

August 10, Lincoln City Sandcastle Contest at Siletz Bay
An amateur contest with a focus on fun, this event has contestants using only sand and other materials found on the beach such as shells and other natural materials. There will also be live music. Come join in the fun or just watch the “artists” at work from the pier.

August 17-19, Eugene Food Truck Fest
Music, live entertainment, a tasting competition, and kids activities are all part of this event featuring food trucks with a variety of fare including cupcakes, BBQ, vegan dishes, Latin, Cuban food, as well as Hawaiian, Mexican, and Vietnamese. Family friendly fun can be found at this event, as well, and its held in PK Park in Eugene. For information, visit www.eugenefoodtruckfest.com.

August 18, Pirate Treasure Hunt – Depoe Bay
This annual charity event has young and old dressing like pirates, gathering clues, and searching for the treasure hidden somewhere in Depoe Bay. A day full of fun followed by a silent and live auction. For more information, visit www.treasuredepoebay.org. 

August 24, Hayday 2019 – Beer Festival
Beautiful Cannon Beach plays host to this festival that features 40 Oregon craft beers for sampling along with live music and good food. Visit www.publiccoastbrewing.com for details.

Olympic National Park

August 25, Free Entrance to National Parks
Help the National Park Service celebrate its 103rd birthday and come visit the National Park of your choice! To recognize the big event, NPS is hosting a fee-free day. No entry fee? That’s better than cake! To find an Oregon National Park, visit www.nps.gov/state/or.

September 13-15, Cannon Beach Cottage & Garden Tour
Tour historic cottages and beach homes during this annual event in Cannon Beach. There is also live music, historic and garden lectures, wine tasting, and other fun during this weekend-long event. An English-style garden tea will be held on Sunday. For information, visit www.cannonbeach.org.

Mt Hood Village • Welches, OR

September 13-15, Rods ‘N Rhodies Invitational Car Show
The City of Florence plays host to the 12th Annual Invitational Rods ‘N Rhodies Car Show which will showcase hot rods and cruisers dating pre-1976. Held in Old Town Florence, there will also be food, music, a city-wide garage sale, and a book festival. For more information, visit www.florencechamber.com.

Tiny House, Big Hype

The Tiny House Movement is taking the glamping community by storm. Bigger is definitely not better in this case, because these unique accommodations are even being bought and used as family homes. These tiny home owners and glampers are living in about 200 square feet, and they are lavishing in the miniminimalistic lifestyle. Skeptics may wonder why and how people would choose to be confined in that small of a space all the time. As interesting as the concept may sound to those “bigger is better” believers, inhabitants of the homes fall in love with the experience. The hype for tiny homes is real and verifiable not only for how cute they are, but for benefits they have not only for your health but also the environment. 

Henry, a tiny house at the Tuxbury Tiny House Village.

Size isn’t everything 

Surprisingly, some of these tiny houses can easily sleep 5 people. Fully equipped with a kitchen and full bathroom, many tiny houses also have an upstairs loft area. So, if you think you and your glamping companions will be constantly stepping on each other toes, think again. You and your four favorite friends will be housed quite comfortably, and you’ll have entertaining photos to prove it 

They push you to spend more time outdoors 

Although the sleeping and general living accommodations are available in a small footprint, spending all of your days inside is no way to live, regardless of square footage. Nonetheless, tiny home living pushes guests to want to be outside more, ultimately expanding their living space. More time being spent outside is related to better mental health, which might be why tiny house residents enjoy the experience so much! You are truly living with the environment in a tiny house. 

A friend to the environment –

Tiny homes are environmentally beneficial. For one, they’re typically made from wood and mostly recycled material, and use much less energy and building material compared to a normal sized house. Additionally, the average house uses approximately 30,000 pounds of CO2 a year, while tiny homes use an average of 2,000. Less electricity use and less land space, the environmental impact, or lack thereof, is just one of many reasons vacationing tiny is an attractive choiceA smaller house ultimately brings a smaller carbon footprint, and we’re talking tiny. 

Staying put is so last year –

Tiny homes can also act like RVs! If you have a vehicle that can pull and RV, it can tow a road ready tiny home, and some builders (such as Tumbleweed Tiny House Company) ensure their tinies are RVIA certified. The camping world is surely your oyster as you can still be a nomad family on the go, even though you are still technically living in a house. There’s no way to feel confined in a tiny home if you can live in it literally anywhere you choose. Tired of the warm southern weather? Just move north! You will never exhaust a location living the tiny life.  

Adeline, a tiny house at the Leavenworth Tiny House Village.

 You can give the tiny house life a try by visiting any of our tiny house villages!

 

 

 

Glamping – It’s all the Rage!

Yurt • Circle M RV & Camping Resort

It may have become official when the word was added to the Merriam-Webster dictionary in 2018, but “glamping” has quietly become quite trendy over the past several years. The word itself it’s a combination, or portmanteau, if you will, of glamour and camping. The concept is simple, combine luxury amenities and accommodations with the outdoor activity of camping, and voila, you’re glamping.

But why has it become such a big thing in the last few years?  Simply put, American’s are looking to combine two of their favorite things – relaxing, and being outdoors with the caveat of making it less stressful when it comes to the accommodations part. No more making sure you arrive before dark so you can see all the tent poles, or waking up with an aching back which may wreak havoc on daytime activities like hiking and canoeing. According to a market research study done by Arizton, the glamping market will reach roughly $1 billion by 2024 in the U.S. Glamping is here to stay!

Glamping certainly amps up an outdoor experience in many ways. Accommodations for glamping are designed to give you the maximum amount of luxury, while staying true to the concept of communing with nature. What today’s glamper is looking for is camping amenities that include unique and quality sleeping options, onsite private kitchens and bathrooms, and a location that is near major attractions but still provides that “off the beaten path” feeling, while not sacrificing resort amenities and facilities.

Yurt Yosemite Lakes Groveland, CA

Of course, whether your camp or glamp, the benefits are still the same. The reduction in stress levels when you go off grid and spend time outside is tremendous.

So, how do you glamp?

First off, unique accommodations such as yurts, cabins, teepees and tiny houses are considered glamping accommodations. Yurts are spacious, and typically can accommodate queen-sized beds, bathroom suites with showers and kitchenettes. Similarly, cabins provide ample space for more luxurious amenities and plenty of space to relax and enjoy your camping company. Teepees are unique, and well, just plain cool. As for the tiny houses, these little darlings are so well-appointed they feel just like home.

Location is also a factor for your outdoor foray to be considered glamping. To be glamping-worthy, your campground should have clean, accessible bathrooms (if your accommodations do not provide private bathrooms), electric hook-ups, onsite amenities like pools and laundry rooms and should be pet-friendly (after all, if you’re a pet-lover, you wouldn’t consider adventuring without your four-legged bestie along for the ride.) Access to recreation should also be available, whether at the location or nearby.

Horses RanchoOso Photo By JulieVader

Some Petite Retreats glamping locations to consider would include:

Yosemite Lakes (Groveland, CA) – Check off access to recreation with Yosemite National Park just up the road, and the campground is pet friendly. As for accommodations, check out the yurts here.

Rancho Oso – The scenery surrounding the campground, which includes Los Padres National Forest and the Santa Ynez River, provides relaxing vibes, while the teepees are ultra-cool for bedding down after a day spent horseback riding or hiking. And yes, pets are welcome.

Mt. Desert Narrows (Bar Harbor, ME) – The rugged east coast location, proximity to Acadia National Park, the cozy cabin accommodations, and the pet friendly attitude make this campground a glamping possibility.

Other items that can make you a glamper include interesting menu items other than traditional camping fare that can be created over your campfire or camp kitchen, fun cocktails, or mocktails, to relax after the day’s events, cozy blankets and chairs to relax in, and aromatics or incense to keep things smelling fresh!

Sunset • Mt Desert Narrows Camping Resort

Check out other Petite Retreat locations and get your first glamping experience under your belt. You don’t want to be left out in the cold on this trend!