Introducing: American Forests

American Forests, the oldest conservation organization in the United States, is committed to creating healthy forests from coast to coast. And we plan on digging right in to assist the effort and are pleased to announce that through our agreement with the organization, and more specifically, their American ReLeaf program, we are committed to planting 100,000 trees in areas including the Sierra Mountains, the Northern Rockies, Laguna Atascosa and Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuges, and the Great Lakes region as well as the Southeast. These areas have been identified as those in need of reforesting.

With our business rooted in outdoor recreation and the fact that we pride ourselves on our locations that are near beautiful forests and woodlands, this partnership makes perfect sense.

Forests are not only a great way to help with our climate issues, they also provide habitats for so many species. In the Southeast, the reforesting focus on longleaf and slash pines will help restore habitats for gophers, red-cockaded woodpeckers, tortoises, and indigo snakes. In the Northern Rockies, Grizzly bears, red squirrels and golden-mantled ground squirrels will benefit from the reforesting efforts in this area as the Kirtland warbler did and will continue to do thanks to reforesting efforts in the Great Lakes region. These tiny songbirds have been delisted from the Endangered Species Act thanks to the continued reforesting of the jack pine.

Deschutes National Forest in Oregon.

As we roll up our collective sleeves and get to work on this busy, and important, task of committing to plant 100,000 trees, we will provide updates as we grow about our way!

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Not your Average Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day has been traditionally celebrated in the United States on the second Sunday of May since 1914 but the tradition to honor Mothers dates to Ancient Greece. Here are a few things to think about when considering what to gift Mom with this year – Mother’s Day is the busiest day for restaurants; it’s the third highest selling holiday for plants and flowers; and more phone calls are made on this day than any other in the year. So, if you want your celebration to be like everyone else, by all means buy the flowers, book the restaurant, and give Mom a call. But, if you think your honoree is extra special and want the celebration to be unique, just like her, check out these options. And remember, whether you celebrate on May 9, or choose another day – these are all still good ideas!

Cabin at Spring Gulch in New Holland, PA.

Take in a Farmer’s Market: Plan a stay in an oh, so tranquil yurt at Tall Chief and head into Seattle to explore the iconic, and always entertaining, Pike Place Market. If you’re there during Mother’s Day Weekend, check out the Market’s 13th Annual Flower Festival that runs May 8-9 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Whether you book a cabin at Pennsylvania’s Appalachian or Spring Gulch, you’re about an hour’s drive from Philadelphia’s Headhouse Farmer’s Market which is open on Sundays and features 50 rotating vendors. Taking in Santa Barbara for a Mother’s Day holiday? Book your stay at Rancho Oso and then consider a Sunday drive down the sunny California coast to Santa Monica to explore the city’s Downtown Farmer’s Market that runs from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Waterfall in Portland Japanese Garden.

Walk Through a Garden: Reserve a charming tiny house at Oregon’s Mt. Hood Tiny House Village and then spend the day in nearby Portland taking in the views at the city’s Japanese Garden. Spread over 5.5 acres, the garden is serene and tranquil with several different gardens including the Tea Garden and the Natural Garden. For information and reservations for timed visits, go to japanesegarden.org. The Wild Gardens of Acadia can be found in Maine’s Acadia National Park and feature over 400 species of flowers, shrubs, trees and other plants native to the area. For more details visit acadiamagic.com. For the perfect accommodation when visiting Bar Harbor and Acadia National Park, book a colorful cottage at Narrows Too in nearby Trenton.

Botanical gardens of Acadia National Park in Maine.

Get Active (sort of): Try an e-bike (pedal-assisted) and enjoy the scenery of Leavenworth, Washington. The Leavenworth Mountain Tour explores downtown Leavenworth as well as Icicle Creek Canyon and the historic Leavenworth Ski Hill. Visit bavarianebiketours.com for more details. Book one of the five tiny houses at Leavenworth Tiny House Village for your stay. Or try something a bit out of the ordinary, but very trendy, and take a goat yoga class. Check out Legacy Lane Farm in Stratham, New Hampshire, which offers goat yoga classes every Sunday, and also has a Country Home Store onsite that sells handmade lotions and soaps made from goat’s milk. To continue your Namaste kind of day, book a tiny house accommodation at Tuxbury Tiny House Village and relax after a day at the farm.

Tiny House Emerson at Tuxbury Tiny House Village in South Hampton, NH.

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Because it’s all about the Grapes

Whoever came up with the calendar that recognizes national days of celebration in May must be an oenophile – or what regular folks call a wine lover. May has two days dedicated to vino – National Moscato Day on May 9 and National Wine Day on May 25. So, let’s raise our glasses of whichever fermented grape is your favorite and toast to America’s Wine Trails.

Cozy cabin at Verde Valley in Cottonwood, AZ.

Arizona’s Verde Valley Wine Trail (vvwinetrail.com) has at least 10 wineries (check the website for a downloadable map) set among the beautiful countryside that includes locations in Jerome, Cottonwood, and Sedona. Book a tiny home at Verde Valley and you’ll find yourself in perfect proximity to explore Alcantara Vineyards, which is less than a 5-minute drive or a nice 1.4-mile hike from the resort. One unique way to see the vineyards is to do the Water to Wine Kayak Trip – check out sedonaadventuretours.com. Another option if you don’t want to go solo is to check out the tours offered through Sedona Vineyard tours (sedonavineyardtours.com).

Glamping Tent at Marina Dunes in Marina, CA.

If you’ve already done California’s northern wine country (Napa, Sonoma, etc.) consider the wineries of Paso Robles for a different perspective. Start your adventure with a glamping reservation at Marina Dunes and then take the day to head to Paso Robles to explore their grape offerings. For details, visit pasorobleswineries.net. There are plenty of options for tours, including group, private and even one where a non-drinking guide drives your car! And, if you want to taste something different than wine, consider an olive oil tasting at Pasolivo (pasolivo.com).

Vineyard in the Willamette Valley region of Oregon.

Did you know that Oregon’s lush Willamette Valley is home to two-thirds of all of Oregon’s wineries and vineyards? Start your trip off right by requesting a downloadable brochure from willamettewines.com and booking a tiny house at Mt. Hood’s Tiny House Village so at day’s end you have the best place to enjoy some of the wines you purchase along the way. All kinds of tours are available for Oregon Oenophiles, so check out agreatoregonwinetour.com for some options. Fun Fact: because of Oregon’s cooler climate, the state’s signature grape is the Pinot Noir, which is considered one of the oldest grapes in the world.

Cabin at Lake George Escape in Lake George, NY.

While not specifically devoted to wine alone, the Beverage Trails near Lake George, New York, do offer wine tasting along with spirits, cider, and beer. Book a rental cabin or cottage at Lake George Escape and try a different libation every day!  In addition to the Winery Production Facility, The Adirondack Winery has two additional tasting locations in the area as well. Check out visitlakegeorge.com/things-to-do/beverage-trails.

If you book a cozy cabin at Neshonoc Lakeside you can explore parts, or all, of Wisconsin’s Great River Road Wine Trail which stretches from northern Iowa to southern Minnesota. In addition to the great wineries, your drive will serve as an attraction as well. The river part of the Great River Road refers to the Mighty Mississippi so the route includes valleys, bluffs, and views of the river, all among a perfect country setting. Visit greatriverroadwinetrail.org for more information.

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5 Things to Do in… Nashville

Nashville, Tennessee, is known as Music City U.S.A. As home to the historic Ryman Auditorium, the iconic Grand Ole Opry and a stretch of honky tonks offering plenty of country music, the moniker is a no-brainer. And while many people visit Nashville to hear the music, visit these iconic places and learn about country music’s history with a visit to the city’s County Music Hall of Fame and Museum, we’ve found a few more reasons to visit this southern town that’s always humming with something to do.

  1. Where the Wild Things Are: Nashville is home to all kinds of wild animals – but don’t be afraid of the ones we’re talking about. Polar Bear fan? Head over to the Edgehill neighborhood of Nashville to see two very large polar bears engaged in a snowball fight. At the corner of Edgehill Avenue and 12th Avenue South, the two polar bears, originally created as an advertisement for a frozen custard shop, each hold an armful of “snowballs” and appear ready for battle. More wild animals can be found in the Bellevue neighborhood and the menagerie here includes several dinosaurs, a lion, a tiger, and a bear. While the property on which the animals “reside” is private, the very large figures can be seen from a drive down Poplar Creek Road.
  1. Civil Rights History: A portion of the U.S. Civil Rights Trail can be found in Nashville and it includes the Woolworth on 5th location (now closed) which was the site of a 1960s lunch counter sit-in. The city’s public library houses the Civil Rights Room (open to the public when the library is open) which details the history of the movement through exhibits and displays. Check out civilrightstrail.com for more Nashville sites on this trail.
Hiking trail in the forest in Nashville, TN.
  1. Explore the Greenways: Nashville has roughly 100 miles of greenways that are great for walking, biking and taking in the scenery. There are short stretches and long stretches, parts that run along rivers and streams and parts that feature native flora, fauna and historic areas. For a downloadable map, visit greenwaysfornashville.org.
Fried Bologna, Grilled Cheese Sandwich
  1. Foodie Adventures: Certainly, you can take one of the many organized food tours – check out nashvillefoodtours.com to see what’s cooking, or you can go solo and see what we have on the menu: Try a fried bologna sandwich at Robert’s Western World on Broadway; experience what Southerners call “meat and three” at Monell’s, a Nashville staple for great food; or enjoy the fried chicken and biscuits at the Loveless Café, which has been serving up this southern favorite for over 65 years. For desserts, consider a Unicorn Milkshake from the Legendairy Milkshake Bar or throw back to the 1950s and enjoy a dipped cone from Bobbie’s Dairy Dip, which has been serving ice cream and shakes (as well as burgers) in the same location since 1951.
Giraffe at the Nashville, TN Zoo.
  1. Where the Wild Things Are: Part 2: Nashville isn’t even in the Top 10 of U.S. cities when it comes to population (it ranks 23rd) and yet, they do fall into the Top 10 when it come to largest zoos in the country (based on landmass)! Go figure! What the Nashville Zoo offers over its 188 acres, of which only 90 have been developed, is nearly 3,000 animals representing more than 350 different species. The unique Kangaroo Kickabout gives visitors the opportunity to interact with red kangaroos – yep, walk around in their habitat – with them! Another unique feature about this zoo is the historic Grassmere Home. Built in 1810, the home is the centerpiece of the Zoo and is open for guided tours. New at the Zoo this year is the Tiger Crossroads exhibit; Expedition Peru: Trek of the Andean Bear exhibit and several baby kangaroos and two caracals recently born. Visit nashvillezoo.org for hours of operation and ticket information. 
Nashville themed cabin at Natchez Trace in Hohenwald, TN.

While checking out music city, plan to stay in an adorably themed cozy cabin at Natchez Trace. Or, be one of the first to stay at the Natchez Trace Tiny House Village, coming soon!

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It’s Earth Day and the Party’s Outside

Celebrating Earth Day can be as simple as loving every little bit of what makes up our great planet. The 71% of it that is made up of water – which includes lakes, rivers, streams and of course, the oceans; or the 21% that is made up of sand; or the 31% covered by forests. And, of course, the best way to love something is to spend time with it. This April 22, get outside and enjoy what this magical planet has offer. Swim in the ocean or kayak a lake, climb a mountain, stick your toes in the sand, or trek through a forest. And, whichever you choose, remember the mantra to leave it the way you found it, if not better!

Tiny House Murphy at Tuxbury Tiny House Village in South Hampton, NH.

Forest Focus: Book a tiny house stay at New Hampshire’s Tuxbury Tiny House Village and you’re about 90 miles from White Mountain National Forest, which offers all kinds of outdoor activities from hiking and climbing to fishing and rockhounding. Another great tiny house and another great forest can be found in Leavenworth, Washington. Book a stay at Leavenworth Tiny House Village and explore the four million acres of forestland in Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest where you can mountain bike, horseback ride, and find plenty of hiking trails.

Tiny House Rudolf at Leavenworth Tiny House Village in Leavenworth, WA.

Water, Water Everywhere: Explore some of the waters that make up 71% of the Earth – start with the Pacific Ocean and plan a stay in one of the cabins at Santa Barbara’s Rancho Oso. Plenty of oceanfront beaches to choose from here. Looking for a brush with fame? Try Butterfly Beach and keep your eyes peeled for the occasional celebrity. Want to watch a great sunset? Try Hendry’s Beach where your four-legged friends are welcome to take in the show, too! Head to the Florida Keys and you’ll be surrounded by water. Snorkel, scuba dive, parasail, or fish these warm Florida waters. A tiny house accommodation at Sunshine Key Tiny House Village or a colorful cottage at Fiesta Key make the perfect Keys home base.

Yosemite Merced River el Capitan Panorama.

Mountains of Fun: While most people are familiar with Yosemite’s Half Dome and El Capitan, this magnificent national park is actually home to 20 mountains that exceed 10,000 feet in elevation – the adventurous can choose to climb while the aesthetics of these snow-capped beauties will please just about anyone! Make a reservation for a totally groovy yurt at Yosemite Lakes and then spend Earth Day amid the mountains of Yosemite. How about spending the day around mountains that have magic powers? Head to Sedona to experience the healing powers of the magnificent Red Rocks, specifically Cathedral Rock and Bell Rock. Book a tiny house at Verde Valley and soak up that magic. 

Glamping Tent at Marina Dunes RV Park in Marina, CA.

And that sand we mentioned – rent a cabin or a cottage at Oregon’s Pacific City and you’re so close to Cannon Beach and the iconic Haystack Rock; you can spend Earth Day surrounded by soft sand and the sounds of the ocean. Check out the coastal dunes at the Marina Dunes Preserve and stay at in an ultra-cool Glamping Tent at Marina Dunes RV Park.

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Green City Getaways

With April having two dates that recognize the importance of taking care of our Earth (Earth Day and Arbor Day), it makes sense to plan a trip to visit a Green City this month (or in the future).

Cherry tree blossoms on the waterfront in Portland, OR.

According to treehugger.com, there are several things to take into consideration in determining how “green” a city is. Those include efficient public transportation, quality public space, plentiful parks, and the availability of bike lanes as well as composting and recycling programs. One other interesting item is whether a city offers “good green fun,” which means farmer’s markets, plenty of organic fare served up in the local eating and drinking establishments and music festivals and outdoor events that feature solar-powered stages and valet parking for bicycles. There are several more “green definers” and combined that’s a lot for a city to tackle, yet slowly but surely, more and more of our urban areas around the country are hitting the mark when it comes to being green. Additionally, there are many different groups providing different rankings for these cities, but some consistently make the grade across the board.

  1. San Diego, California: San Diego’s nickname is “America’s Finest City”, but it can also boast being one of America’s greenest cities. San Diego is home to Balboa Park, one of the largest urban parks in the country. Other green things about this southern California city include dozens of weekly farmer’s markets, a major “Farm to Fork” movement in the dining industry, a variety of public transportation including trolleys, shuttles, and pedi-cabs, and plenty of opportunities for green fun including kayaking, mountain biking, and surfing.

Book a cabin or cottage stay at Pio Pico or Oakzanita Springs for a San Diego Green Getaway.

Tiny House Savannah at Mt. Hood Tiny House Village in Welches, OR.
  1. Portland, Oregon: With over 90,000 acres of green space and a top-notch biking/walking trail system, Portland is definitely eco-friendly. In fact, they have the highest rate of workers biking to the office than any other U.S. city. They were also one of the first cities to ban the use of plastic bags. For green space, visitors and residents alike need to look no further than the city’s Forest Park, a 5200-acre urban forest, featuring hiking and biking trails, waterfalls, and plenty of greenery!

Book a stay at the Mt. Hood Tiny House Village for a Portland Green Getaway.

Cozy cabin Yukon Trails in Lyndon Station, WI.
  1. Madison, Wisconsin: Did you know that the man behind Earth Day was from Wisconsin? Gaylord Nelson, who served as both governor and senator of the state was not only a politician, but also an avid environmentalist, calling upon the citizens of America to bring awareness to problems with the environment. So naturally, it makes sense that Madison would be a green city – it’s in the genes! Madison consistently ranks as a green city thanks to its abundance of green space – from plenty of city parks to acres of lakes and miles of biking and hiking trails. Madison is home to more bikes than cars and the city is very walkable. The city has more farmer’s markets than you can shake a cucumber at, and in fact, Saturday on the Square, an event that features more than 250 vendors, is a popular destination for visitors and Mad-Town residents like.

Book a cabin stay at Yukon Trails for a Madison Green Getaway.

Lake Eola Park in Orlando, FL.
  1. Orlando, Florida: While green space is not as abundant as in some of the other green cities, Orlando makes the green grade thanks to its continued efforts and eye to the future when it comes to being, and staying, green. With goals like a 40% city-wide tree canopy coverage by 2040, the One Person One Tree initiative to help expand the urban forest, and a host of programs to protect the ecosystems found here, Orlando is definitely putting a green foot forward. And to clarify, they have plenty of green space to the tune of more than 100 parks, plus plenty of lakes and wetlands.
Colorful cottage stay at Tropical Palms in Kissimmee, FL.

Book a colorful cottage stay at Tropical Palms for an Orlando Green Getaway.

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5 Things to Do in… San Diego

The climate alone is reason enough to plan a getaway to San Diego. There’s plenty of sunshine and 80-degree days to be found here. There’s also the draw of the ocean and the miles of beaches as well as the history, the theme parks, a world-class zoo, and much more. We came up with five ways to experience this sunny southern California favorite:

Sunset on La Jolla Beach, CA.
  1. Act Like a Local: Some say the best way to get to know a city is to do what the locals do. So, we checked in with a San Diegan and here’s what they suggest: Start the day with a walk/hike along Sunset Cliffs. Next, head over to Wonderland for mimosas and brunch and some great ocean views. After that, check out the pier at Ocean Beach, which is one of the longest piers on the West coast and has great sea lion sightings. Spend the afternoon strolling Newport Avenue with its cool shops – including surf shops and antiques. Enjoy an afternoon nosh at South Beach for local beers and great fish tacos. End the day with dinner at the OB Noodle House for great Asian fare.
Ocean Beach Pier in San Diego.
  1. Act Like a Kid: What’s more fun than a bunch of Legos (unless, of course, they’re on the floor and you’re barefoot)? Head to Carlsbad and visit LEGOLAND California which is a theme park, a water park, and an aquarium all rolled into one guaranteed fun time. The aquarium portion of LEGOLAND has 350 different species featuring over 6000 sea creatures. The water park has all kinds of wet fun from wave pools to waterslides. And, of course, the theme park has thrill rides, shows, and a Lego retail store. As for Legos, all attractions include a Lego miniland made from millions of genuine Legos. Watch where you step!
  1. Act Like an Athlete: With 70 miles of coastline, water sports are the thing to do in San Diego. Wakeboarding, kitesurfing, kayaking, surfing, and bodysurfing are just a few of the water challenges to be attempted when visiting San Diego. The San Diego Surf School (sandiegosurfingschool.com) offers private, semi-private, and group lessons as well as surf camps and surf retreats for adults. If you’re gonna attempt hanging ten, consider that San Diego has some of the warmest waters and several of the best surfing breaks on the California coast.
  1. Act Like a Foodie: A few years back, Thrillist.com said San Diego was a hotspot for fresh-sourced ingredients and world-class street food and a few years later, San Diego remains a foodie favorite. A good place to start to explore the food scene here is through one of the several food tours offered. Bite San Diego (bitesandiego.com) offers six different neighborhood tours that serve up a side of each neighborhood’s history, as well! Or try the Tequila, Tacos and Tombstones Tour offered through viator.com that takes you through a food and walking tour of the city’s historic Old Town.
Getaway cabin at Pio Pico in Jamul, CA.
  1. Act Like a Glamper: We’ve got two great locations where you can get your glamping fix in while exploring all that San Diego has to offer. Pio Pico in nearby Jamul has great cottage and cabin options for your consideration. The resort has bike trails, pickleball courts, nature and hiking trails, a pool, hot tub, and a game room. Each rental cottage sleeps six, has heat and A/C, full-sized refrigerators, electric coffeemakers and microwaves and full-sized bathrooms/showers. Cabins at Pio Pico sleep 4-6, have full-sized bathrooms/showers and kitchens with microwaves and refrigerators. Oakzanita Springs is another option for glamping during a San Diego getaway. Each of the two cottage rentals sleeps 6 while the two cabin rentals sleep 4. All have full-size bathrooms/showers and a variety of kitchen amenities. The resort has bike trails, nature and hiking trails, a swimming pool, hot tub, and bocci and horseshoes.
Cozy cabin at Oakzanita Springs in Descanso, CA.

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5 Things to do in… Palm Springs!

Palm Springs is a great destination no matter the time of year. Indoor and outdoor attractions abound and the area enjoys a dry, desert climate. There’s history, nature, arts and culture, shopping, plenty to eat and drink and, of course, an abundance of sunshine. We decided to take an elemental approach to our visit. In keeping with the 5 Elements of Nature – earth, water, fire, air, and space, let’s see what Palms Springs has to offer (and please forgive our artistic license!):

colorful cottage at Palm Springs in Palm Desert, CA.
  1. Earth: The desert is the earth to explore here. Head to Joshua Tree National Park for a spiritual reset and explore the Mojave Desert. Make sure to see Giant Rock – a freestanding boulder (possibly the largest in the world) that is considered sacred by Native Americans. Hike some of the trails in the Coachella Valley Preserve – the McCallum Trail is an easy 1.8 mile option as is the Indian Palms Trail at 1.2 miles; the Hidden Palms Loop, with its beautiful wildflowers is a bit longer at 1.9 miles while the Pushawalla Palms Loop tracs at 4.4 miles.
Rocks in Joshua Tree National Park illuminated by sunset, Mojave Desert, California
  1. Water: This one’s easy thanks to the several waterfalls found in and near Palm Springs. There’s the Tahquitz Falls, a 60-foot waterfall that can be viewed via a short hike; Seven Sisters Waterfall, another hike-worthy option; and West Fork Falls, which can be seen from December through March in Palm Canyon.
  1. Air: Several options here. There’s the Palm Springs Air Museum, which is considered one of the top aviation museums in the world, and its display of combat aircraft ranging from World War II to the Vietnam era. Or, take to the air in the Palm Springs Aerial Tram that provides breathtaking views of Chino Canyon.
  1. Fire: There are several ways to interpret this one when visiting Palm Springs, so indulge us, please. It can be the heat from the sunshine – of which Palm Springs experiences approximately 350 days of sun or it can be the heat found in the range of spicy foods including Thai, Peruvian, Indian as well as the spicy Bloody Mary offered at Cheeky’s.
View of the mountain landscape at Mount San Jacinto State Park near Palm Springs, California.
  1. Space: spacetourism.com lists 10 places in the Palm Springs area that are perfect for night sky viewing. Joshua Tree National park is one spot and others include the Coachella Valley Preserve and Mt. San Jacinto. Visit spacetourismguide.com/stargazing-palm-springs for more information.

While exploring this vibrant town, book a colorful cottage at our Palm Springs location to call your home base.

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Getting Outdoors with Outdoorsy!

One good thing to come out of the crazy year of 2020 was the return of the road trip. Adulting means putting away our childish things and for many of us, that meant saying goodbye to the road trips of summer vacations long past. Too busy, not enough vacation time, and the list goes on. But with social bubbles and social distancing, the road trip has become the best way to get away, whether for a short jaunt or a long expedition. Take the ultimate road trip to the next level when it comes to “beyond” and considering renting an RV.

We’ve partnered with Outdoorsy.com, considered one of the most trusted RV rental marketplaces in the country, to highlight some of the coolest rentals around when it comes to RVs.

Cathedral Rock in Sedona, AZ.

Camper Van! Anyone watch Nomadland? Camper vans played a major role in the movie where life on the road was the way to be. Consider the rental from PHX VAN LIFE and road trip from the pick-up point in Gilbert, Arizona, down to Sedona. Book a stay at Verde Valley RV Resort in Cottonwood and along the way enjoy Montezuma’s Castle National Monument, the splish-splash fun of Slide Rock State Park and of course, the beauty and tranquility of Sedona and the Red Rocks.

Bambi

Check out Bambi, a towable camper with sleeping space, a kitchen, sink, and fridge! Hook up with Bambi in Austin, Texas, and enjoy a 239-mile road trip to our Bay Landing RV Resort.  From Austin to Bridgeport, the road trip itinerary can include a stop along the way in Waco to see Magnolia Market, the Dr. Pepper Museum, and take a hike on the Cotton Belt Trail, an 11-mile paved route, accessible for all levels of hikers.

Fiesta Key in Long Key, FL.

A VW Vanagon sounds like a great option for being a road trip vagabond while exploring Florida. This iconic wagon sleeps two and can be picked up in Gulfport located on, of course, the Gulf Coast. From there, why not drive leisurely down south to take the mother of all road trips tackling the Overseas Highways and the fabulous Florida Keys. Plan to stay at one of our great Keys locations, Sunshine Key or Fiesta Key and explore the Keys with its water sports, nature preserves and plenty of fun found in Key West.

VW Vanagon

How about a California Coast trip? Pick up the well-equipped Fleetwood Tioga Arrow just outside LA. Take a day or so and stay at the Palm Springs RV Resort to check out Palm Springs – think Joshua Tree and great desert hikes – and then hit the coast and head to Santa Barbara and plan a stay at Rancho Oso RV Resort. SB fun includes breathtaking sunsets, plenty of beach time, and all the SB attractions including architectural tours, winery visits, shopping, and great waterfront restaurants.

Fleetwood Tioga Arrow

Heading to the Midwest? Get hip and rent this retro-style 2015 Shasta. Meet up with your new digs in Indianapolis and then settle in for an extended Midwestern road trip. Stops could include Indiana’s Amish Village of Shipshewana (and a stay at Twin Mills RV Resort), Michigan’s Harbor Country (and a stay at Bear Cave RV Resort in Buchanan), and a beautiful drive around Lake Michigan into Wisconsin. Make reservations at our Wisconsin RV resorts, including locations in the Wisconsin Dells, outside the capital city of Madison and in beautiful Door County. Wisconsin highlights could include Dells attractions like the Ishnala Supper Club, a magical dining establishment nestled among the pines with great views, or water tours of Lake Delton aboard the iconic Ducks; charming Door County with its kayaking, biking and hiking opportunities; and Madison and its fabulous Saturday Farmers Market, Olbrich Botanical Gardens and a trip to nearby Taliesin, Frank Lloyd Wright’s 800-acre estate that includes his home and studio.

2015 Shasta

Doesn’t it seem like the iconic Airstream and road trips go hand in hand? Consider renting the one that’s available in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and then exploring PA Dutch Country and staying at any of our locations sprinkled throughout the area. Amish culture, craft breweries and distilleries, rolling fields and serene landscapes, farmer’s markets, and more are part of this PA adventure. Or, trek into Philadelphia for some history lessons and a Philly Cheesesteak!

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Women’s History Month

March is the month to celebrate the role of women in American history and their contributions. All around the country, there are heritage sites including monuments, homesteads, works of art, and more that represent these women and their efforts in all areas from nursing and politics to civil rights, women’s rights and in the arts. We’ve listed just a few here and whether you visit now or later, it’s never too late to honor the efforts of these women.

“Gettysburg Civil War Women-s Memorial – Elizabeth Masser Thorn 1” by Amaury Laporte is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

The Gettysburg Civil War Women’s Memorial: This seven-foot bronze sculpture of Elizabeth Thorn is located in Gettysburg’s Evergreen Cemetery. Thorn was six months pregnant at the time of the Battle of Gettysburg. Prior to the war, her husband was the caretaker of the cemetery but when he enlisted in the Union Army, the caretaking tasks fell to Elizabeth and her father. After the battle, the heavily pregnant Thorn buried 91 soldiers and 14 civilians killed in the siege.  The memorial is a tribute to all women who served, and suffered, due to the war.

Cozy cabin at Drummer Boy in Gettysburg, PA.

Stay with us in a cabin at Drummer Boy to explore Gettysburg and see the memorial.

Buildings by Julia Morgan: San Francisco native, Julia Morgan was the first woman to graduate UC Berkeley’s Civil Engineering program in 1894 and went on to become the first licensed woman architect in California. During her career, she designed more than 700 buildings throughout California, most notably Hearst Castle in San Simeon. For a listing of sites and locations of Morgan’s works, visit sf.curbed.com/maps/julia-morgan-buildings-best-sf.

“Sunset at Hearst Castle” by Trey Ratcliff is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Stay with us in a glamping tent at Marina Dunes and enjoy a ride up the California coast to see Morgan’s works in the San Francisco area or down the coast to tour Hearst’s Castle.

Glamping tent at Marina Dunes in Marina, CA.

National Cowgirl Hall of Fame and Museum: According to their website, the museum is the only museum in the world dedicated to honoring the women of the West. Located in Fort Worth, Texas, the museum has archival footage as well as artifacts from these trailblazing women. Hall of Fame inductees include Sacagawea, Annie Oakley, Dale Evans, and Laura Ingalls Wilder. For information, visit cowgirl.net.

Stay with us in a cabin at Bay Landing in nearby Bridgeport while you explore the Cowgirl Museum.

Acadia National Park, Mount Desert Island, Maine: Why is a national park on the list of women’s history heritage sites? Because Beatrix Farrand, a noted landscape gardener, designed the carriage roads in this beautiful national treasure. Also, Farrand created the rock-walled reflections rooms at the garden at the College of the Atlantic in nearby Bar Harbor in 1928. Born in New York in 1872, Farrand preferred to be called a landscape architect. She also designed First Lady Gardens at the White House during the Wilson Administration.

Cozy cabins at Narrows Too RV Resort in Trenton, ME.

Stay at Mt. Desert Narrows or Narrows Too RV Resort while visiting Acadia NP.

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